Water Storage Tank Campaign

Thank you to our generous storage tank donors!

Watoto Kicheko is just finishing up a quick campaign to raise enough money to buy some extra storage tanks for water. The campaign has been really amazing, starting on Friday evening, with about 85% of the money we needed by Monday morning. We needed $500 altogether, about $130 for a small tank (2000 liters), that we can also transport water in, and the rest for a 5000 liter tank.

Unless we find ways of cutting down water usage substantially, these will only ensure an adequate supply for a few days, which wouldn’t have been enough over the last few months. We have been out nearly every day to forage for water, as if we lived in a village with no well or borehole. Yet we pay huge amounts for rent and local services and amenities.

The water company keeps charging us what it has always charged us, but we don’t get water most of the time. There is certainly no way we can use as much as usual when we might only get water on 3 or 4 days a month. But the bills look suspiciously similar, as if someone else is getting the water and we are paying for it. But, surely not!

Storage tank for rainwater harvesting

Anyhow, the next step will be to implement a rainwater harvesting scheme for the rainy months, and we might increase storage capacity again for that. So we’ll have a separate campaign later, but all that depends on where we are based at the time. So we’ll keep people informed through Facebook, our website, etc.

Thank you again to our donors!

As a matter of interest, although our campaing stretched out to many countries via Facebook and other media, our most regular contributors are our neighbours! Tanzanians and Kenyans send us dontions by mobile money (Mpesa, TigoPesa, etc, details for sending donations are on our Donations page). Anyone can send money through PayPal, but it’s nice to know that some of our most avid supporters are so easy to reach.

By Simon Collery

Simon Collery has been an online content writer and blogger since the late 1990s, developing content for an information industry website, and later, writing about development, HIV, human rights and other subjects, mainly in East Africa. He is a co-founder of the Don't Get Stuck Collective, a group of people who write and agitate for greater recognition of non-sexually transmitted HIV and other bloodborne disease, especially through unsafe healthcare, cosmetic and traditional practices, mainly in Africa and Asia. He also blogs about media depictions of African people, unethical practices by publicly funded western institutions in African countries, mass male circumcision programs carried out in African countries using mainly US funding, and other subjects. He has a particular interest in Kenya and Tanzania.