Child Carers and Other Baby Home Staff

Child carers at Watoto Kicheko

Child carers at Watoto Kicheko

Child carers at Watoto Kicheko are expected to perform numerous tasks, as any parent would understand. Each child  carer must look after several children at a time, while also looking out for other children that may ocasionally have strayed from the view of a colleague.

Child carer selection and training

But child carers at Watoto Kicheko are carefully selected, trained and mentored. And they certainly do a wonderful job. Naturally, they are adored by our children, to whom they are mothers, fathers, friends and teachers. Even when a child is in hospital, a carer must stay in the hospital with the child and make sure they are fed, changed and treated well.

Almost all our children are at home right now, here at Watoto Kicheko. Careen is still in hospital, but should be home soon. Junior is very sick, though. He has had some major medical treatment, to which he did not respond very well, so it is to be hoped that he will be back with us soon. We look forward to seeing him start to grow and develop as he should.

Child carers and tradition

Child carers at work

Child carers at work

While child carers are almost always female in Tanzania, it would be a mistake to think that the male staff here don’t do any child care work. All of them enjoy playing with our children, taking them out for walks and generally spending time with them. Indeed, the ‘tradition’ of children being almost exclusively the responsibility of women is beginning to change.

As I write, I can see six of the older kids playing. Amongst the laughter and shouting one of the twins is howling after falling over. Nothing serious, they always howl particularly loudly! But mainly the sounds are of the children running around joyfully, with the child carers giving occasional directions, administering sympathy and even playing happily themselves.

By Simon Collery

Simon Collery has been an online content writer and blogger since the late 1990s, developing content for an information industry website, and later, writing about development, HIV, human rights and other subjects, mainly in East Africa. He is a co-founder of the Don't Get Stuck Collective, a group of people who write and agitate for greater recognition of non-sexually transmitted HIV and other bloodborne disease, especially through unsafe healthcare, cosmetic and traditional practices, mainly in Africa and Asia. He also blogs about media depictions of African people, unethical practices by publicly funded western institutions in African countries, mass male circumcision programs carried out in African countries using mainly US funding, and other subjects. He has a particular interest in Kenya and Tanzania.